General tubulin buffer: 1x stock

General tubulin buffer: 1x stock
$0.00

Product Uses Include

  •  Resuspension and storage of tubulin

 

Material
General tubulin buffer (PEM). Contains 80 mM PIPES pH 6.9, 2 mM MgCl2 and 0.5 mM EGTA. Used as a tubulin working buffer in the form of G-PEM (i.e. PEM plus 1 mM GTP (Cat.# BST06)) or a tubulin polymerization buffer in the form of glycerol containing G-PEM (PEM plus 1 mM GTP (Cat. # BST06) and e.g. 5% glycerol (see Cat. # BST05)).

For product Datasheets and MSDSs please click on the PDF links below.   For additional information, click on the FAQs tab above or contact our Technical Support department at tservice@cytoskeleton.com

Chen et al., 2012. Protopine, a novel microtubule-stabilizing agent, causes mitotic arrest and apoptotic cell death in human hormone-refractory prostate cancer cell lines. Cancer Lett. 315, 1-11.

Hartley et al., 2012. Polygamain, a New Microtubule Depolymerizing Agent That Occupies a Unique Pharmacophore in the Colchicine Site. Mol. Pharmacol. 81, 431-439.

Chang et al., 2011. Mycotoxin Citrinin Induced Cell Cycle G2/M Arrest and Numerical Chromosomal Aberration Associated with Disruption of Microtubule Formation in Human Cells. Toxicol. Sci. 119, 84–92.

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Faridi et al., 2011. Proteomics indicates modulation of tubulin polymerization by L-menthol inhibiting human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation. Proteomics. 11, 2115-2119. 

Carletti et al., 2011. Effect of protein glutathionylation on neuronal cytoskeleton: a potential link to neurodegeneration. Neuroscience. 192, 285-294.

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Kushkuley et al., 2009. Neurofilament cross-bridging competes with kinesin-dependent association of neurofilaments with microtubules. J Cell Sci. 122, 3579-86.

Chen et al., 2005. A-432411, a novel indolinone compound that disrupts spindle pole formation and inhibits human cancer cell growth. Mol. Cancer Ther. 4, 562-568.

Huang et al., 2005. CIL-102 interacts with microtubule polymerization and causes mitotic arrest following apoptosis in the human prostate cancer PC-3 cell line. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 2771-2779.

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Mooberry et al., 1999. Laulimalide and isolaulimalide, new paclitaxel-like microtubule-stabilizing agents. Cancer Res. 59, 653-660.

 

Question 1:  How does general tubulin buffer differ from G-PEM buffer?

Answer 1:Basically, these buffers are the same except that G-PEM contains 1mM GTP to support tubulin polymerization.  General tubulin buffer (Cat. # BST01) and PEM buffer typically contain 80 mM PIPES, 2 mM MgCl2, 0.5 mM EGTA pH 7.0.  Both buffers should be supplemented with 1 mM GTP (hence, the “G” in G-PEM buffer).

 

Question 2: Is glycerol necessary for the maintenance of biologically-active tubulin?

Answer 2:Glycerol is often added to a final concentration of 5 - 10% to enhance polymerization; however, glycerol is not necessary for the maintenance of biologically active tubulin.

 

 

If you have any questions concerning this product, please contact our Technical Service department at tservice@cytoskeleton.com